2.22.2009

Noticia del Concierto de Enrique Bunbury en Chicago


Muy buen artículo, me gusto mucho, el único detalle es que está publicado en el diario Chicago Sun-times, así que solo en inglés está disponible... El otro punto interesante, es que no es un diario latino, así que eso significa que a Enrique le va bien por allá... Por acá la dejamos...


Spain's Enrique Bunbury, en fuego, at the Aragon


February 21, 2009
BY
LAURA EMERICK lemerick@suntimes.com
You’d have to factor in the dangerous allure of Jim Morrison, the chameleon-like charisma of David Bowie and utter originality of Elvis Presley, and even then, you probably couldn’t find anyone close to matching the restless inventiveness and white-hot intensity of Latin rock icon Enrique Bunbury.


Since ’80s, Bunbury has taken on many guises and proven to be the master of them all: leader of Spain’s foremost rock group, Heroes del Silencio; impresario and provocateur (his “Freak Show” and multiple side projects), and mentor and muse (he has championed rising artists such as Colombia’s Cabas, while Spanish pop star Raphael claims Bunbury as his spiritual heir — and unlikely soulmate).


Thursday night at the Aragon, Bunbury returned to Chicago after a four-year absence and put on a 2œ-hour spectacular that showcased his ever-changing stylistic moves. Charging out of the gate with “El Club de Los Imposibles” (from his 2002 disc “Flamingos”), he proved to be as fiery and dynamic as ever.


From the Elvis-in-Vegas style slash-kicks to his pugilistic stances, he had it all going on. Throughout, he generated the kind of heat that makes women (and maybe some men) swoon. If I ever would feel the urge to leap off the Aragon balcony, in a sort of liebestod of appreciation, Bunbury could push me over the edge. Of course, some regard his feral poses, along with his cowboy garb, occasional feather boas and painted fingernails, as too outre. But they’re all integral parts of the Bunbury persona.


His latest disc, “Hellville de Luxe” (EMI, 2008), reveals another aspect of his ongoing fascination with American roots music: this time, Dylanesque folk/country-tinged rock. But he devoted most of his concert Thursday to tracks from his discs “Pequeno” (1999), “Flamingos” and “El Viaje a Ninguna Parte” (2004). Though he told the crowd early on that he intended to rock out, much of the performance bore the lipstick traces of his baroque vaudeville-cabaret phrase.


In homage to Chicago, the home of the blues, several songs turned mood indigo, including “Contar Contigo,” “Infinito” and “El Viento al Favor.” Elsewhere, he layered in his usual complement of eclectic touches, such as a Link Wray-style guitar solo at the beginning of “Sacame de Aqui.” To play up the rootsy “Hellville de Luxe” vibe, pedal steel guitar and accordion were added to several songs.


His new band, which replaced his much-loved Huracan Ambulante, matched their leader’s fervor, especially on the crowd favorite “Lady Blue.” Vocally, Bunbury displayed his usual versatility, ranging from a bluesy snarl to a chanson croon. Though some find it over the top, his voice gives every song just the right theatrical flair.


As a songwriter, Bunbury often travels the bleak terrain of desolation and loneliness. “Canto (El Mismo Dolor)” and “Y Al Final,” from the second set of encores Thursday, reflected that theme and put an introspective spin on a largely exuberant evening.


The audience adored him, and Bunbury drank in their idolation. For the Aragon show, he attracted his biggest Chicago turnout yet — an encouraging sign, given that he receives little if any radio airplay in this market and seemingly not much label support in the United States (his latest is available only as an import).


It’s ironic that someone who has totally absorbed the American blues/roots rock ethos has yet to receive a complete embrace in the land of perhaps his greatest inspiration. After his five-city U.S. tour winds up, Bunbury will head to Mexico for a 13-concert engagement. That’s a country that knows how to express its appreciation.

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